Disappointment in Prayer


“Then Jesus told them a parable about their need to pray always and not to lose heart” (Luke 18:1). Jesus understood how easy it is for his followers to become discouraged. That’s why he told his disciples “to pray always and not lose heart.”

The first time I remember being disappointed with prayer was when I was 12. My uncle was dying of lung cancer. The phone would ring early in the morning. It was my Aunt Laura calling from Connecticut to give my mother the latest update on Uncle Ray’s condition. When she hung up the phone, my mother would do two things. She’d go in the bathroom and throw up. The stress was too much for her. And she would pray. She prayed more for my Uncle Ray’s healing than I had ever known her to pray for anything. She sent money to a prominent televangelist, because he said if she did God would work a miracle. As my uncle slid closer toward death, she prayed more and gave more. It didn’t work. Despite all the praying and giving, Uncle Ray died.

What do we do when we pray and are discouraged because God doesn’t answer, or says no, or gives us a different answer than the one we wanted? Jesus said the answer is to “pray always and not lose heart.” Easier said than done.

Psalm 136:1 says, “Give thanks to the Lord for He is good.” God isn’t just good. He’s good to me. Even when he doesn’t give me what I want, God loves me dearly and wants what’s best for me. The only way I can persevere in prayer is when I trust God and believe in his goodness.

The Parable of the Unjust Judge (Luke 18:1-8) reminds us we need to keep on believing and keep on praying no matter what. Nowhere in the Bible will you find a verse that says to just ask God once and then stop asking.

An important part of persevering in prayer is humility. We have to be humble enough to realize that what we want isn’t always what God knows is best. That’s why Jesus prayed in the Garden of Gethsemane, “Father, if you are willing, remove this cup from me; yet, not my will but thy will be done” (Luke 22:42).

According to William Barclay, judges like the one in the parable were paid magistrates who were notorious for taking bribes. A defenseless widow like the one in the story stood little chance of winning her suit. She prevailed because she wore the judge down by her persistence. The story has a happy ending, even if real life often does not.

What do we do with this parable when we know that God doesn’t always fix things the way good people want it, even good people who pray persistently? We have to remember that every promise of scripture isn’t absolute but relative. If God promises to heal or perform miracles for those who have enough faith, that doesn’t mean God is under any obligation to heal or perform miracles. Faith doesn’t just mean believing you’ll get what you want.

Faith means trusting in God, regardless of whether he does what we want him to do. Faith means praying, “Thy will be done,” not “My will be done.” Faith means believing that God will answer us but understanding that he may not give us the answer we want.


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Hungry For Change


Woman picks through food waste in Kampala, Uganda

October is World Hunger Month. It’s an important time to remember how daunting the problem of hunger is. One billion people in the world are hungry, and over 46 million Americans are “food insecure,” meaning they skip meals or cannot afford to eat healthy. That’s surprising since 1.3 billion tons of food are thrown away annually. That’s enough to feed all the hungry people in the world. There’s no shortage of food. There’s an abundance of poverty. Those with enough money eat well whether they live in Washington DC or Timbuktu. There’s also an abundance of greed, corruption, and infrastructure challenges that contribute to the problem of food insecurity.

While I was in Africa I saw up close the devastating effects of a broken global food system. I remember watching a woman picking through a pile of food waste in Uganda and children begging on the streets in war-ravaged Somalia. The hunger problem in America is less obvious. Poor families rely on cheap, unhealthy processed food to get enough calories, which has led to an obesity epidemic. We usually think of skinny, emaciated people as hungry. Overweight people may not be hungry, technically speaking, but obesity is often due to a lack of affordable, healthy food.

Giving food to the hungry is a stop-gap that treats the symptom, not the root problem. What would it look like if we got serious about trying to end hunger and poverty, not just put a Band-Aid on the problem? I’m not sure, but it should start with building relationships with the poor, not just giving them food or money (though sometimes that’s what they need most to help them through a crisis). Using our God-given time, talents, and resources, we could empower those in need to work toward getting out of poverty themselves and helping others to do the same. A hand up rather than a hand out. What’s needed is an approach that captures the spirit of the following quote by Lao Tzu:

Go to the people:

live with them,

learn from them

love them

start with what they know

build with what they have.


But of the best leaders,

when the job is done,

the task accomplished,

the people will say:

“We have done it ourselves.”

What would that look like in the context of relief for the poor? Scholarships to help pay for education and job training. Microfinance programs to start small businesses. Childcare co-ops for single mothers. Ride sharing. Community gardens. The possibilities are endless.

Sometimes the challenges seem so overwhelming that paralysis sets in. We don’t know where to begin, so we don’t. But the problems of poverty and hunger won’t solve themselves. We need to take action. We need to begin. To quote Lao Tzu again, “The journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” So let’s get moving.

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Gone Missing

Kindly reader, I am a blog without a blogger

He has gone missing for weeks

and my house is empty. Suffer me awhile,

or go, and if you meet him—

he with a distant look and shambling gait—

tell him the hearth is cooling down.


I won’t know a thing for days,

he takes to a walk-about

and never pays me notice.

What kind of life is that?


Yet I’ve never expected different—

I’m glad he just comes back at all.

And you could say absence

sometimes makes for a better blog.


Adapted from Paul Quenon, “Gone Missing,” in Unquiet Vigil: New and Selected Poems (Brewster, MA: Paraclete Press, 2014), 13-14. The words “poem” and “poet” have been replaced with “blog” and “blogger.”

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Easter Sunrise Service, Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, March 27, 2016

Easter Sunrise Service, Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Africa, March 27, 2016

We often associate docility with weakness and assertiveness with strength, but the opposite is true when it comes to living the Christian life and responding to the Holy Spirit. Too often we are like a toddler fighting against a parent who is trying to lead it by the hand. We pull away. We protest. We pout. We make ourselves miserable, resisting God’s will for our lives.

When the Navy told me I would be mobilized and deployed to Djibouti, Africa for a year, I didn’t want to go. Djibouti is hot, miserably hot, and a year is a long time to be away from my family. I prayed that God would give me the grace to accept his will in this matter, even if it’s not what I want. Guess what! He did. This deployment has turned out to be a blessing, not a curse as I had feared. It has taught me a lot about God.

Docile submission to God’s will is a key to spiritual growth. This is a lesson I am still learning. I spent weeks planning an Easter trip to Mogadishu, Somalia with the goal of leading worship for a handful of American and European troops stationed there. The logistics were complicated since there are currently no commercial flights to Somalia due to safety concerns. The commanding general allowed me to borrow his plane – a Beechcraft C-12 twin turboprop aircraft. We took off on Friday, March 25, only to turn around after 45 minutes and return to base due to mechanical problems. After that my trip was canceled. I spent Easter weekend at my home base: Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti.

Instead of grumbling and complaining, I accepted the change as part of God’s plan and asked him to show me opportunities for service. I wasn’t on the preaching schedule, so I attended all of the Holy Week services both Protestant and Catholic. On Saturday, much to my surprise, I was asked to preach the Easter Sunrise service and assist with the main Protestant service. Because my plans changed, I had some unexpected and meaningful opportunities.

As I continue to learn the importance of docile submission to God’s will, Proverbs 3:5-6 come to mind: “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.” My hope and prayer is that we will all grow in this grace.

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Lenten Journey

Grand Bara

Grand Bara Desert, Djibouti, Africa

Today is the second Sunday of Lent. Lent is a forty day period of prayer and fasting in preparation for Easter. It recalls the 40 days Jesus spent fasting in the wilderness before he was tempted by the devil. The number 40 in the Bible is symbolic of testing. Not testing like an exam, but testing like a refiner’s fire. Not only does the spiritual journey of Lent remind us of Jesus’ ordeal, but I can also see a parallel between his journey into the Palestinian wilderness and my journey into the Djiboutian wilderness.

The Bible passage for today, Luke 9:28-43, has two seemingly unrelated miracle stories: the Transfiguration and the Healing of a Demon-Possessed Boy. One takes place on a mountaintop, the other on the plain. One is a private miracle witnessed by only three disciples, the other by a large crowd. In one miracle Jesus himself is changed, in the other Jesus changes someone else. In one God speaks from heaven, in the other a demon speaks from the one he possessed. One provokes fear and silence, the other amazement. Despite the stark contrasts, these two stories are complimentary, not contradictory. They represent the two journeys of the Christian life: the inward journey of prayer and the outward journey of service.

The background to the first miracle, the Transfiguration, is Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the Living God. Matthew’s Gospel tells us, “From that time on, Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and undergo great suffering at the hands of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.” (Matt. 16:21). Yet Peter resisted Jesus’ prediction and even rebuked Jesus for saying he must be killed then raised to life. The other disciples didn’t have any better understanding. Before the Resurrection they shared the Jewish view that the Messiah would be a conquering king who slays the wicked, not a suffering servant who dies for them.

Jesus chooses three disciples – Peter, James, and John – to witness his Transfiguration. Luke tells us, And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white. Suddenly they saw two men, Moses and Elijah, talking to him. They appeared in glory and were speaking of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem (Luke 9:29-32). A cloud then covers him and a voice from heaven says, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!” (Luke 9:35). Moses and Elijah are significant, because they represent the Old Testament Law and the Prophets. The point is that both the Law and the Prophets discuss the death of Jesus, even though the Jews – including Peter – failed to understand.

The purpose of the Transfiguration was twofold: to remove the offense of the cross from the disciples’ hearts and to give the disciples hope that the body of Jesus will be raised and glorified after his death. The miracle gives us the same hope for our own bodies. In the Book of Philippians, the Apostle Paul reminds us that “our citizenship is in heaven, and it is from there that we are expecting a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. He will transform the body of our humiliation so that it may be conformed to the body of his glory” (Phil. 3:20-21).

In the second miracle story Jesus heals a demon-possessed boy with epileptic seizures. The disciples hadn’t been able to cast the demon out. Presumably these were the disciples who weren’t with him on the mountain. Throughout Luke’s Gospel there is a special focus on the poor and needy, the outsiders and the neglected. This story demonstrates Jesus’ love for those at the margins of society.

Lent invites us on a spiritual journey into the wilderness. Our sins are exposed and by God’s grace removed. Jesus is the Light of the World. His light not only reveals our imperfections, but cleanses and transforms us. We cannot encounter God without being changed. When Moses came down from Mt. Sinai “the skin of his face shone because he had been talking with God” (Exodus 34:29b). The more time we spend with God, the more we become like him, and the more his light will shine through us and on those in darkness.

During Lent God invites us to become intentional about both the journey inward and the journey outward. What would our lives would look like if each one of us took God up on his invitation? What would our church look like if we all did? I’m not exactly sure, but I’d love to find out!


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Mary Christmas


David Dances Before the Ark, Francesco Salviati, 1552-1554

Mary Christmas! It’s not a typo. No Mary, No Christmas. Know Mary, know Christmas. When the Angel Gabriel announced to Mary that she would conceive the “Son of the Most High” in her virginal womb, her “yes” – her “Fiat” (let it be) echoed God’s “Fiat Lux” (let there be light). Mary’s consent allowed for an even greater creation than the first. The original creation brought forth the sun, which sustains earthly life, but Mary brought forth the Son God, who gives eternal life.

Mary is the new Eve. Just as we are all children of Adam’s spouse, we are also all children of Mary. Through Eve’s disobedience sin entered the world and passed unto every one of us. Through Mary’s obedience, the remedy for sin entered the world: Jesus Christ, the Savior.

Mary is not only the new Eve, she’s also the new Ark. As in the Ark of the Covenant, which most people know from the Indiana Jones movie Raiders of the Lost Ark. The Ark was the most sacred object in ancient Israel – a wooden box overlaid with gold whose lid, the Mercy Seat, had two golden angels with wings unfurled. It was both a container for holy objects and a piece of furniture fashioned after God’s directions and placed in a room called the Holy of Holies, first in the Tabernacle and later in the Temple in Jerusalem.

The Philistines captured the Ark in battle but returned it after God sent a plague on them. When it was returned, “the ark was lodged at Kiriath-jearim, a long time passed, some twenty years, and all the house of Israel lamented after the Lord” (1 Sam. 7:2). Second Samuel chapter six narrates the happy occasion when King David brought the Ark to Jerusalem. The parallels between this passage and the story of the Visitation in Luke 1:39-45 are striking.

The recovery of the Ark and the Visitation both take place in the hill country of Judea. In both stories there’s a similar response to a new arrival: “King David [was] leaping and dancing before the Lord” (2 Sam. 6:16), and “When Elizabeth heard Mary’s greeting, the child leaped in her womb” (Luke 1:41). David and Elizabeth ask similar questions. David says, “How can the ark of the Lord come into my care?” (2 Sam. 6:9). Elizabeth says, “And why has this happened to me, that the mother of my Lord comes to me?” (Luke 1:43).

Finally, the contents of the Ark and Mary are similar. The Ark contained the original tablets upon which God wrote the Ten Commandments, the “covenant” from which it derived its name. It also held a pot of manna and the rod of Aaron, which miraculously budded. Three objects: God’s Word, God’s bread, and the God-given symbol of High Priestly authority. Similarly, the expectant Mary contained the One who is God’s Word (John 1:1, 14), the Bread of Life who like manna came down from heaven (John 6:31-25), and our Great High Priest (Heb. 4:14).

As we await the celebration of Christ’s birth, let’s remember that because of Mary’s “yes,” allowing herself to become a vessel for God himself, it’s both a Merry Christmas and a Mary Christmas.

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I’m writing this on Thanksgiving Day and I’m tempted to say all the many things I’m thankful for. Instead, I want to share something that God’s been teaching me lately. We all know about the benefits of prayer, Bible study, and worship for growing in the Christian life. These are all important. But one of the most important spiritual practices in the New Testament is often ignored: hospitality.

Have you ever noticed how often the Gospels tell us that Jesus was eating a meal with people when he taught them? Learning and teaching during mealtime was a practice embedded in Jewish culture. To this day the Passover celebration takes place during a meal – called the Seder. In this meal the story is retold and questions are asked and answered about God’s miraculous deliverance of his chosen people from Egypt. The Passover Meal is the background for the Lord’s Supper in which Jesus identified the bread and wine with his body and blood. The early Christians celebrated this meal daily in their homes (Acts 2:42, 46).

Jews extended hospitality not only because it was part of their culture, but they did it to be obedient to God and his Word. The book of Proverbs even says hospitality should be extended to one’s enemies: “If your enemies are hungry, give them bread to eat; and if they are thirsty, give them water to drink; for you will heap coals of fire on their heads, and the Lord will reward you.” (Prov. 25:21-22).

Jesus used the language of hospitality to describe the Kingdom of God. It’s like a great banquet to which many are invited he explained on one occasion (Matt. 22:1-14). On another he told a parable about a host going next door to borrow food from a reluctant neighbor as an illustration for persevering in prayer (Luke 11:5-13).

In his Parable of the Sheep and the Goats, Jesus even ties hospitality to salvation: “Come, you that are blessed by my Father, inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world; for I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me something to drink, I was a stranger and you welcomed me” (Matt. 25:34-35). What is Hospitality? It’s giving food to the hungry and drink to the thirsty. It’s inviting strangers in. It’s treating people as if they were Jesus Christ himself, because in a sense that’s who they really are.

Leo Tolstoy wrote a short story called “Martin the Cobbler” found in his book What Men Live By that illustrates this point. It concerns a man who was told, through prayer, that Christ was going to visit him on a certain day. He went about his business as usual; he was a shoemaker. His first customer was a prostitute; the second, a mother with a sick child; and the third was an alcoholic. He hurried around trying to be hospitable to these people, offering them a kind word and something to eat, as well as fixing their shoes. When evening came he was rather disappointed, for it was time to lock up—and Christ still hadn’t come. He was very unhappy until he heard a voice saying, “But I had come, in the person of each of the people to whom you offered hospitality today.” (Doherty, Poustinia, p. 84) If Christ were to visit us today in the form of a homeless person or a Syrian refugee, how would we receive him? Would we show him hospitality? Ignore him? Or worse, treat him with contempt?

Hospitality is reciprocal. It’s both giving and receiving. When Jesus sent out the 12 Apostles to preach he told them not to bring any provisions so they’d be forced to rely on the hospitality of others (Matt. 10:9). That requires both faith and humility.

But Jesus wasn’t asking them to do anything he hadn’t done himself. Although Jesus was God from all eternity with all the riches of heaven at his disposal, for our sake he humbled himself in the miracle of the Incarnation by becoming human. He didn’t arrive in this world as a full grown man capable of providing for himself, but as a helpless baby who had to be fed and burped and changed.

It’s just as important to accept the hospitality of others as it is to give hospitality. To do this, we have to be humble, flexible, and open. It also means that we can’t always be in a hurry, ready to rush off to the next task.

Hospitality isn’t just a matter of good manners. It’s a way of life and an attitude of the heart. If we consistently practice hospitality, we’ll be walking in the footsteps of Jesus.


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