Tag Archives: Djibouti

Docility

Easter Sunrise Service, Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, March 27, 2016

Easter Sunrise Service, Camp Lemonnier, Djibouti, Africa, March 27, 2016

We often associate docility with weakness and assertiveness with strength, but the opposite is true when it comes to living the Christian life and responding to the Holy Spirit. Too often we are like a toddler fighting against a parent who is trying to lead it by the hand. We pull away. We protest. We pout. We make ourselves miserable, resisting God’s will for our lives.

When the Navy told me I would be mobilized and deployed to Djibouti, Africa for a year, I didn’t want to go. Djibouti is hot, miserably hot, and a year is a long time to be away from my family. I prayed that God would give me the grace to accept his will in this matter, even if it’s not what I want. Guess what! He did. This deployment has turned out to be a blessing, not a curse as I had feared. It has taught me a lot about God.

Docile submission to God’s will is a key to spiritual growth. This is a lesson I am still learning. I spent weeks planning an Easter trip to Mogadishu, Somalia with the goal of leading worship for a handful of American and European troops stationed there. The logistics were complicated since there are currently no commercial flights to Somalia due to safety concerns. The commanding general allowed me to borrow his plane – a Beechcraft C-12 twin turboprop aircraft. We took off on Friday, March 25, only to turn around after 45 minutes and return to base due to mechanical problems. After that my trip was canceled. I spent Easter weekend at my home base: Camp Lemonnier in Djibouti.

Instead of grumbling and complaining, I accepted the change as part of God’s plan and asked him to show me opportunities for service. I wasn’t on the preaching schedule, so I attended all of the Holy Week services both Protestant and Catholic. On Saturday, much to my surprise, I was asked to preach the Easter Sunrise service and assist with the main Protestant service. Because my plans changed, I had some unexpected and meaningful opportunities.

As I continue to learn the importance of docile submission to God’s will, Proverbs 3:5-6 come to mind: “Trust in the LORD with all your heart and lean not on your own understanding; in all your ways submit to him, and he will make your paths straight.” My hope and prayer is that we will all grow in this grace.

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Lenten Journey

Grand Bara

Grand Bara Desert, Djibouti, Africa

Today is the second Sunday of Lent. Lent is a forty day period of prayer and fasting in preparation for Easter. It recalls the 40 days Jesus spent fasting in the wilderness before he was tempted by the devil. The number 40 in the Bible is symbolic of testing. Not testing like an exam, but testing like a refiner’s fire. Not only does the spiritual journey of Lent remind us of Jesus’ ordeal, but I can also see a parallel between his journey into the Palestinian wilderness and my journey into the Djiboutian wilderness.

The Bible passage for today, Luke 9:28-43, has two seemingly unrelated miracle stories: the Transfiguration and the Healing of a Demon-Possessed Boy. One takes place on a mountaintop, the other on the plain. One is a private miracle witnessed by only three disciples, the other by a large crowd. In one miracle Jesus himself is changed, in the other Jesus changes someone else. In one God speaks from heaven, in the other a demon speaks from the one he possessed. One provokes fear and silence, the other amazement. Despite the stark contrasts, these two stories are complimentary, not contradictory. They represent the two journeys of the Christian life: the inward journey of prayer and the outward journey of service.

The background to the first miracle, the Transfiguration, is Peter’s confession that Jesus is the Christ, the Son of the Living God. Matthew’s Gospel tells us, “From that time on, Jesus began to show his disciples that he must go to Jerusalem and undergo great suffering at the hands of the elders and chief priests and scribes, and be killed, and on the third day be raised.” (Matt. 16:21). Yet Peter resisted Jesus’ prediction and even rebuked Jesus for saying he must be killed then raised to life. The other disciples didn’t have any better understanding. Before the Resurrection they shared the Jewish view that the Messiah would be a conquering king who slays the wicked, not a suffering servant who dies for them.

Jesus chooses three disciples – Peter, James, and John – to witness his Transfiguration. Luke tells us, And while he was praying, the appearance of his face changed, and his clothes became dazzling white. Suddenly they saw two men, Moses and Elijah, talking to him. They appeared in glory and were speaking of his departure, which he was about to accomplish at Jerusalem (Luke 9:29-32). A cloud then covers him and a voice from heaven says, “This is my Son, my Chosen; listen to him!” (Luke 9:35). Moses and Elijah are significant, because they represent the Old Testament Law and the Prophets. The point is that both the Law and the Prophets discuss the death of Jesus, even though the Jews – including Peter – failed to understand.

The purpose of the Transfiguration was twofold: to remove the offense of the cross from the disciples’ hearts and to give the disciples hope that the body of Jesus will be raised and glorified after his death. The miracle gives us the same hope for our own bodies. In the Book of Philippians, the Apostle Paul reminds us that “our citizenship is in heaven, and it is from there that we are expecting a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ. He will transform the body of our humiliation so that it may be conformed to the body of his glory” (Phil. 3:20-21).

In the second miracle story Jesus heals a demon-possessed boy with epileptic seizures. The disciples hadn’t been able to cast the demon out. Presumably these were the disciples who weren’t with him on the mountain. Throughout Luke’s Gospel there is a special focus on the poor and needy, the outsiders and the neglected. This story demonstrates Jesus’ love for those at the margins of society.

Lent invites us on a spiritual journey into the wilderness. Our sins are exposed and by God’s grace removed. Jesus is the Light of the World. His light not only reveals our imperfections, but cleanses and transforms us. We cannot encounter God without being changed. When Moses came down from Mt. Sinai “the skin of his face shone because he had been talking with God” (Exodus 34:29b). The more time we spend with God, the more we become like him, and the more his light will shine through us and on those in darkness.

During Lent God invites us to become intentional about both the journey inward and the journey outward. What would our lives would look like if each one of us took God up on his invitation? What would our church look like if we all did? I’m not exactly sure, but I’d love to find out!

 

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Into Africa

tree of life

Tree of Life, Walt Disney World

The one thing predictable about life is its unpredictability. Since my last post – a while ago, I know – I’ve embarked on an unexpected, and in some ways unwanted, journey. I use the word “journey” literally, not just metaphorically.

I left my church on June 19 for an involuntary, yearlong mobilization and deployment to Djibouti, Africa where I serve as the senior US military chaplain. (If your African geography is as shaky as mine, I’ll give you some help: Djibouti is surrounded by the countries of Somalia, Ethiopia, and Eritrea in the so-called Horn of Africa.) Camp Lemonnier, my new duty station, is a US Navy base with over 4,000 personnel aboard, including all branches of our military, foreign military personnel, and civilians.

I arrived in Djibouti on July 16 and have adjusted to the time difference and extreme climate, for the most part (“extreme” as in extremely hot). Part of my job is traveling to wherever we have even a small number of US troops. I’ve already been on two trips: a brief one to Mogadishu, Somalia (called “the most dangerous city in the world”) and a longer stop at a base in Kenya where I saw scenes that looked straight out of The Lion King: a giant crane soars majestically over an ancient thick-trunked Tree of Life, curious little black-faced monkeys scamper around the camp looking for scraps of food, a small antelope called a dik-dik bounds through the jungle.

But, as exotic as the wildlife is, by far the greater experience has been meeting people from all walks of life: military and civilian, career military and reservists, male and female, young and old, people of all nationalities from all parts of the globe—more diverse than the flora and fauna of Africa.

I’ve often said the greatest joy of ministry is dealing with people, and the greatest challenge of ministry is dealing with people. That’s true here too, though so far the joys far outweigh the challenges.Moger in Somalia

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